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Sugar Trading forecasts and signals

Total signals – 3

Active signals for Sugar

Total signals – 0
TraderAccuracy by symbol, %Opening quoteTargetCreation dateForecast closure dateS/L and сommentPrice
No results found.
 
 

Sugar rate traders

Total number of traders – 2
Demetris
Symbols: 77
Polymetal, Rusal, Yandex, QIWI, Aeroflot (MOEX), Gazprom, Nornikel, Lukoil, MTS, Magnit, MOEX Index, Polyus, Rosneft, Sberbank (MOEX), AUD/USD, EUR/RUB, EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/CHF, USD/JPY, USD/RUB, EUR/GBP, USD/CNH, CAD/JPY, EUR/JPY, GBP/JPY, NZD/USD, AUD/CAD, Stellar/USD, Zcash/USD, Cardano/USD, EOS/USD, BitcoinCash/USD, Litecoin/USD, Tron/USD, NEO/USD, Ethereum/USD, Bitcoin/USD, XRP/USD, RTS, US Dollar Index, DAX, NASDAQ 100, S&P 500, RUSSELL 2000, FTSE 100, Brent Crude Oil, WTI Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Palladium, Silver, Gold, Snap, Alphabet, Alibaba, Apple, AT&T, Lukoil, McDonald's, IBM, Meta Platforms, Twitter, Caterpillar, Bank of America, Intel, Exxon Mobil, Tesla Motors, Boeing, Wheat, Sugar, Dogecoin, Binance Coin, Polkadot, Chainlink, Solana, Tezos
Trend
accuracy
73%
  • Polymetal 75%
  • Rusal 89%
  • Yandex 90%
  • QIWI 67%
  • Aeroflot (MOEX) 50%
  • Gazprom 76%
  • Nornikel 93%
  • Lukoil 50%
  • MTS 82%
  • Magnit 69%
  • MOEX Index 71%
  • Polyus 67%
  • Rosneft 100%
  • Sberbank (MOEX) 68%
  • AUD/USD 67%
  • EUR/RUB 70%
  • EUR/USD 72%
  • GBP/USD 74%
  • USD/CAD 67%
  • USD/CHF 72%
  • USD/JPY 66%
  • USD/RUB 70%
  • EUR/GBP 57%
  • USD/CNH 55%
  • CAD/JPY 0%
  • EUR/JPY 100%
  • GBP/JPY 50%
  • NZD/USD 60%
  • AUD/CAD 0%
  • Stellar/USD 75%
  • Zcash/USD 50%
  • Cardano/USD 76%
  • EOS/USD 79%
  • BitcoinCash/USD 71%
  • Litecoin/USD 77%
  • Tron/USD 67%
  • NEO/USD 77%
  • Ethereum/USD 74%
  • Bitcoin/USD 74%
  • XRP/USD 75%
  • RTS 75%
  • US Dollar Index 72%
  • DAX 75%
  • NASDAQ 100 79%
  • S&P 500 81%
  • RUSSELL 2000 100%
  • FTSE 100 25%
  • Brent Crude Oil 64%
  • WTI Crude Oil 67%
  • Natural Gas 60%
  • Palladium 75%
  • Silver 90%
  • Gold 69%
  • Snap 33%
  • Alphabet 62%
  • Alibaba 82%
  • Apple 0%
  • AT&T 0%
  • Lukoil 100%
  • McDonald's 100%
  • IBM 100%
  • Meta Platforms 67%
  • Twitter 78%
  • Caterpillar 50%
  • Bank of America 71%
  • Intel 75%
  • Exxon Mobil 0%
  • Tesla Motors 50%
  • Boeing 75%
  • Wheat 100%
  • Sugar 50%
  • Dogecoin 75%
  • Binance Coin 68%
  • Polkadot 75%
  • Chainlink 75%
  • Solana 75%
  • Tezos 50%
Price
accuracy
72%
  • Polymetal 75%
  • Rusal 89%
  • Yandex 90%
  • QIWI 67%
  • Aeroflot (MOEX) 43%
  • Gazprom 76%
  • Nornikel 93%
  • Lukoil 41%
  • MTS 65%
  • Magnit 69%
  • MOEX Index 71%
  • Polyus 67%
  • Rosneft 100%
  • Sberbank (MOEX) 63%
  • AUD/USD 67%
  • EUR/RUB 68%
  • EUR/USD 70%
  • GBP/USD 74%
  • USD/CAD 67%
  • USD/CHF 71%
  • USD/JPY 66%
  • USD/RUB 70%
  • EUR/GBP 57%
  • USD/CNH 48%
  • CAD/JPY 0%
  • EUR/JPY 100%
  • GBP/JPY 50%
  • NZD/USD 57%
  • AUD/CAD 0%
  • Stellar/USD 75%
  • Zcash/USD 50%
  • Cardano/USD 76%
  • EOS/USD 79%
  • BitcoinCash/USD 71%
  • Litecoin/USD 74%
  • Tron/USD 52%
  • NEO/USD 77%
  • Ethereum/USD 74%
  • Bitcoin/USD 74%
  • XRP/USD 75%
  • RTS 73%
  • US Dollar Index 69%
  • DAX 75%
  • NASDAQ 100 79%
  • S&P 500 81%
  • RUSSELL 2000 100%
  • FTSE 100 25%
  • Brent Crude Oil 64%
  • WTI Crude Oil 67%
  • Natural Gas 60%
  • Palladium 75%
  • Silver 88%
  • Gold 67%
  • Snap 2%
  • Alphabet 62%
  • Alibaba 82%
  • Apple 0%
  • AT&T 0%
  • Lukoil 100%
  • McDonald's 100%
  • IBM 17%
  • Meta Platforms 67%
  • Twitter 78%
  • Caterpillar 50%
  • Bank of America 71%
  • Intel 75%
  • Exxon Mobil 0%
  • Tesla Motors 50%
  • Boeing 70%
  • Wheat 100%
  • Sugar 50%
  • Dogecoin 74%
  • Binance Coin 68%
  • Polkadot 75%
  • Chainlink 75%
  • Solana 75%
  • Tezos 50%
Profitableness,
pips/day
34
  • Polymetal 45
  • Rusal 24
  • Yandex -37
  • QIWI -18
  • Aeroflot (MOEX) -4
  • Gazprom 7
  • Nornikel 54
  • Lukoil -30
  • MTS 58
  • Magnit -14
  • MOEX Index -133
  • Polyus -35
  • Rosneft 57
  • Sberbank (MOEX) 1
  • AUD/USD -3
  • EUR/RUB 0
  • EUR/USD 3
  • GBP/USD 3
  • USD/CAD 1
  • USD/CHF 5
  • USD/JPY -3
  • USD/RUB 2
  • EUR/GBP -5
  • USD/CNH -37
  • CAD/JPY -45
  • EUR/JPY 20
  • GBP/JPY -13
  • NZD/USD -3
  • AUD/CAD -8
  • Stellar/USD -40
  • Zcash/USD 100
  • Cardano/USD 296
  • EOS/USD 30
  • BitcoinCash/USD -13
  • Litecoin/USD 100
  • Tron/USD 0
  • NEO/USD 8
  • Ethereum/USD 35
  • Bitcoin/USD 90
  • XRP/USD 95
  • RTS 2
  • US Dollar Index 3
  • DAX 17
  • NASDAQ 100 20
  • S&P 500 7
  • RUSSELL 2000 400
  • FTSE 100 -25
  • Brent Crude Oil -27
  • WTI Crude Oil 2
  • Natural Gas -49
  • Palladium 0
  • Silver 8
  • Gold -1
  • Snap -7
  • Alphabet -60
  • Alibaba 5
  • Apple -3
  • AT&T 0
  • Lukoil 20
  • McDonald's 13
  • IBM 41
  • Meta Platforms 2
  • Twitter -6
  • Caterpillar -61
  • Bank of America 6
  • Intel 7
  • Exxon Mobil -73
  • Tesla Motors -50
  • Boeing 4
  • Wheat 80
  • Sugar 2
  • Dogecoin 388
  • Binance Coin -214
  • Polkadot 0
  • Chainlink -30
  • Solana 264
  • Tezos -517
More
Plancton
Symbols: 84
AUD/USD, EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/CHF, USD/JPY, USD/RUB, USD/ZAR, USD/TRY, CAD/CHF, EUR/AUD, EUR/NZD, EUR/GBP, USD/CNH, CAD/JPY, USD/SGD, USD/NOK, EUR/CHF, GBP/AUD, GBP/NZD, USD/MXN, AUD/NZD, GBP/CHF, EUR/SGD, EUR/NOK, SGD/JPY, NZD/CHF, AUD/CHF, EUR/JPY, EUR/SEK, CHF/JPY, EUR/CAD, GBP/JPY, NZD/JPY, GBP/SEK, AUD/JPY, NZD/USD, GBP/CAD, NZD/CAD, AUD/CAD, Dash/USD, Stellar/USD, EthereumClassic/USD, Zcash/USD, Cardano/USD, EOS/USD, BitcoinCash/USD, Litecoin/Bitcoin, Litecoin/USD, IOTA/USD, Tron/USD, NEO/Bitcoin, NEO/USD, Ethereum/Bitcoin, Ethereum/USD, Monero/USD, Bitcoin/USD, Nem/USD, QTUM/USD, XRP/USD, US Dollar Index, Dow Jones, NASDAQ 100, S&P 500, Brent Crude Oil, WTI Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Silver, Gold, Platinum, ALCOA, Sugar, Dogecoin, Binance Coin, Polkadot, Uniswap, Chainlink, SushiSwap, BitTorrent, Solana, Aave, Avalanche, EUR/ZAR, Tezos
Trend
accuracy
72%
  • AUD/USD 71%
  • EUR/USD 70%
  • GBP/USD 70%
  • USD/CAD 65%
  • USD/CHF 78%
  • USD/JPY 67%
  • USD/RUB 80%
  • USD/ZAR 50%
  • USD/TRY 100%
  • CAD/CHF 69%
  • EUR/AUD 78%
  • EUR/NZD 69%
  • EUR/GBP 55%
  • USD/CNH 71%
  • CAD/JPY 71%
  • USD/SGD 85%
  • USD/NOK 0%
  • EUR/CHF 71%
  • GBP/AUD 65%
  • GBP/NZD 71%
  • USD/MXN 100%
  • AUD/NZD 59%
  • GBP/CHF 63%
  • EUR/SGD 67%
  • EUR/NOK 33%
  • SGD/JPY 100%
  • NZD/CHF 66%
  • AUD/CHF 68%
  • EUR/JPY 77%
  • EUR/SEK 100%
  • CHF/JPY 71%
  • EUR/CAD 59%
  • GBP/JPY 75%
  • NZD/JPY 67%
  • GBP/SEK 0%
  • AUD/JPY 69%
  • NZD/USD 72%
  • GBP/CAD 65%
  • NZD/CAD 62%
  • AUD/CAD 70%
  • Dash/USD 71%
  • Stellar/USD 74%
  • EthereumClassic/USD 73%
  • Zcash/USD 92%
  • Cardano/USD 73%
  • EOS/USD 72%
  • BitcoinCash/USD 78%
  • Litecoin/Bitcoin 0%
  • Litecoin/USD 77%
  • IOTA/USD 69%
  • Tron/USD 58%
  • NEO/Bitcoin 0%
  • NEO/USD 62%
  • Ethereum/Bitcoin 100%
  • Ethereum/USD 78%
  • Monero/USD 79%
  • Bitcoin/USD 71%
  • Nem/USD 100%
  • QTUM/USD 75%
  • XRP/USD 75%
  • US Dollar Index 80%
  • Dow Jones 76%
  • NASDAQ 100 90%
  • S&P 500 81%
  • Brent Crude Oil 79%
  • WTI Crude Oil 68%
  • Natural Gas 71%
  • Silver 64%
  • Gold 74%
  • Platinum 80%
  • ALCOA 100%
  • Sugar 100%
  • Dogecoin 84%
  • Binance Coin 76%
  • Polkadot 80%
  • Uniswap 74%
  • Chainlink 87%
  • SushiSwap 67%
  • BitTorrent 33%
  • Solana 69%
  • Aave 75%
  • Avalanche 69%
  • EUR/ZAR 50%
  • Tezos 0%
Price
accuracy
71%
  • AUD/USD 71%
  • EUR/USD 68%
  • GBP/USD 70%
  • USD/CAD 65%
  • USD/CHF 74%
  • USD/JPY 67%
  • USD/RUB 80%
  • USD/ZAR 50%
  • USD/TRY 1%
  • CAD/CHF 60%
  • EUR/AUD 78%
  • EUR/NZD 69%
  • EUR/GBP 53%
  • USD/CNH 47%
  • CAD/JPY 69%
  • USD/SGD 85%
  • USD/NOK 5%
  • EUR/CHF 66%
  • GBP/AUD 61%
  • GBP/NZD 70%
  • USD/MXN 100%
  • AUD/NZD 59%
  • GBP/CHF 63%
  • EUR/SGD 67%
  • EUR/NOK 33%
  • SGD/JPY 100%
  • NZD/CHF 65%
  • AUD/CHF 68%
  • EUR/JPY 77%
  • EUR/SEK 100%
  • CHF/JPY 71%
  • EUR/CAD 59%
  • GBP/JPY 75%
  • NZD/JPY 65%
  • GBP/SEK 0%
  • AUD/JPY 70%
  • NZD/USD 72%
  • GBP/CAD 65%
  • NZD/CAD 62%
  • AUD/CAD 66%
  • Dash/USD 71%
  • Stellar/USD 74%
  • EthereumClassic/USD 73%
  • Zcash/USD 92%
  • Cardano/USD 73%
  • EOS/USD 71%
  • BitcoinCash/USD 78%
  • Litecoin/Bitcoin 0%
  • Litecoin/USD 76%
  • IOTA/USD 69%
  • Tron/USD 58%
  • NEO/Bitcoin 0%
  • NEO/USD 62%
  • Ethereum/Bitcoin 91%
  • Ethereum/USD 78%
  • Monero/USD 79%
  • Bitcoin/USD 71%
  • Nem/USD 100%
  • QTUM/USD 75%
  • XRP/USD 74%
  • US Dollar Index 80%
  • Dow Jones 76%
  • NASDAQ 100 90%
  • S&P 500 80%
  • Brent Crude Oil 79%
  • WTI Crude Oil 68%
  • Natural Gas 71%
  • Silver 64%
  • Gold 74%
  • Platinum 80%
  • ALCOA 100%
  • Sugar 5%
  • Dogecoin 86%
  • Binance Coin 76%
  • Polkadot 80%
  • Uniswap 74%
  • Chainlink 82%
  • SushiSwap 67%
  • BitTorrent 33%
  • Solana 69%
  • Aave 75%
  • Avalanche 69%
  • EUR/ZAR 50%
  • Tezos 73%
Profitableness,
pips/day
48
  • AUD/USD 1
  • EUR/USD -1
  • GBP/USD -1
  • USD/CAD -2
  • USD/CHF 6
  • USD/JPY -1
  • USD/RUB -5
  • USD/ZAR 3
  • USD/TRY 127
  • CAD/CHF 2
  • EUR/AUD 10
  • EUR/NZD -1
  • EUR/GBP -7
  • USD/CNH 30
  • CAD/JPY 1
  • USD/SGD 9
  • USD/NOK -680
  • EUR/CHF 4
  • GBP/AUD -6
  • GBP/NZD 1
  • USD/MXN 67
  • AUD/NZD -4
  • GBP/CHF -6
  • EUR/SGD -1
  • EUR/NOK -155
  • SGD/JPY 10
  • NZD/CHF 1
  • AUD/CHF 1
  • EUR/JPY 6
  • EUR/SEK 400
  • CHF/JPY 5
  • EUR/CAD -9
  • GBP/JPY 5
  • NZD/JPY -2
  • GBP/SEK -156
  • AUD/JPY 2
  • NZD/USD 2
  • GBP/CAD -6
  • NZD/CAD -4
  • AUD/CAD 2
  • Dash/USD 10
  • Stellar/USD 14
  • EthereumClassic/USD 18
  • Zcash/USD 82
  • Cardano/USD -19
  • EOS/USD 13
  • BitcoinCash/USD 33
  • Litecoin/Bitcoin -1
  • Litecoin/USD 90
  • IOTA/USD 16
  • Tron/USD -3
  • NEO/Bitcoin 0
  • NEO/USD -137
  • Ethereum/Bitcoin 4
  • Ethereum/USD 61
  • Monero/USD 112
  • Bitcoin/USD 17
  • Nem/USD 184
  • QTUM/USD -100
  • XRP/USD 63
  • US Dollar Index 21
  • Dow Jones 11
  • NASDAQ 100 76
  • S&P 500 6
  • Brent Crude Oil 22
  • WTI Crude Oil 1
  • Natural Gas -8
  • Silver -2
  • Gold 1
  • Platinum 14
  • ALCOA 27
  • Sugar 25
  • Dogecoin 169
  • Binance Coin -78
  • Polkadot 0
  • Uniswap 2
  • Chainlink 12
  • SushiSwap -33
  • BitTorrent -30
  • Solana 0
  • Aave -100
  • Avalanche -37
  • EUR/ZAR -750
  • Tezos -887
More

Completed signals of Sugar

Total signals – 3
Showing 1-3 of 3 items.
TraderDate and time createdForecast closure dateClosing quoteS/LCommentsTrend accuracy in %Price accuracy in %Profitability, pips
Demetris15.11.202218.11.202220.0619.3000.0-24
Demetris15.11.202215.11.202220.3019.00100100.030
Plancton06.01.202108.01.202115.550.161004.675

 

Not activated price forecasts Sugar

Total signals – 3
Showing 1-3 of 3 items.
TraderSymbolOpen dateClose dateOpen price
DemetrisSugar15.11.202222.11.202220.90
DemetrisSugar15.11.202221.11.202220.60
PlanctonSugar06.01.202111.01.20210.16

 

Which commodities to invest in in summer 2021
Brent Crude Oil, commodities, WTI Crude Oil, commodities, Natural Gas, commodities, Copper, mineral, Corn, mineral, Wheat, mineral, Soybean, mineral, Sugar, mineral, Coffee, mineral, Which commodities to invest in in summer 2021 Raw material prices are rising. When the global economy recovers, how long can the boom last?Doug King created his hedge fund at the dawn of the commodity supercycle in 2004. It was just in time: due to insatiable demand from China, prices for everything from oil to copper rose to record highs. Investors flooded the commodity sector. At the peak of sales, King's Merchant Commodity Fund managed approximately $2 billion.But the boom suddenly stopped after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the beginning of the shale revolution in the United States. Prices have fallen, big institutional money has come out, and many specialized hedge funds have closed.Fast forward more than ten years. For King, one of the best periods of his career has begun: a massive boom in raw materials has lifted his hedge fund by almost 50% this year, as commodities, from steel to soybeans, have reached multi-year highs. And now everyone, from pension funds to individuals who sell commodities, makes money from them. And the only question is whether this is a temporary phenomenon after the pandemic or a signal for longer-term changes in the structure of the world economy."We are experiencing a structural inflation shock," King said. "There is a lot of pent-up demand, and everyone wants everything now, right now."For the first time since the pre-crisis years until 2008, the commodity boom means that central banks are concerned about inflation. The rally will also have a political impact.With an oil price of about $70 per barrel, Saudi Arabia and Russia are once again leading the global energy market – a remarkable return after negative prices just over a year ago. The boom is also an undesirable phenomenon for politicians who are resisting the climate crisis: rising commodity prices will make the transition more expensive.China, which depends on imported raw materials to supply millions of factories and construction sites, is so nervous that the government has tried to lower prices by threatening speculators. To some extent, this worked, as copper lost its positions achieved this year. But on average, prices remain high: iron ore is still close to a record, steel prices in the US have tripled this year, coal has risen to a 13-year high, and natural gas prices are rising.Even after the recent pullback, the Bloomberg Commodities Spot Index, which takes into account the prices of 22 commodities, rose by 78% compared to the minimum of March 2020.And crude oil, the most important commodity in the global economy, showed significant growth this year. This prompted traders and Wall Street banks to talk again about the possibility that prices will exceed $100 per barrel for the first time since 2014.As prices rose, so did Wall Street's interest. The annual Robin Hood Investor Conference, which brings together hedge fund luminaries every year, from Paul Tudor Jones to Stanley F. Druckenmiller and Ray Dalio, in early June, included a discussion on commodities. For the first time in the last five years, the conference was given time to discuss commodities.Jeff Curry, a veteran commodity researcher at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., who advocates a long-term bull market for commodities despite the recent sell-off in metals and grains, says there is room for significant investment in the market."Commodities are back in fashion," Curry said. Despite the hype due to sky-high prices, the sector was not able to attract large cash flows, as it was during the boom of 2004-2011.Those investors and traders who have already invested in commodities, betting on recovery after the pandemic, were able to make a profit.Take, for example, Cargill Inc. The world's largest agricultural commodities trader made more money in just the first nine months of the fiscal year than in any full year in its history, as net profit exceeded $4 billion.Or Trafigura Group. It is the second-largest independent oil trader in the world, whose net profit of more than $2 billion in the six months to the end of March was almost the same as for the previous best full year."Our core sales units are operating at full capacity," said Jeremy Weir, chief executive of Trafigura.However, for consumers, the commodity boom means memories of high inflation. For now, companies are mostly taking the brunt of the impact, pushing manufacturing inflation in some countries, including China, to its highest level in more than a decade. But sooner or later, consumers will also pay for it.Companies, from Unilever Plc to Procter & Gamble Co., announced plans to raise prices in the near future."We are seeing levels of commodity inflation that we haven't seen in a very long time," Graham Pitketley, Unilever's chief financial officer, told investors after the release of first – quarter results. "The commodity inflation that we are seeing affects all companies."The speed and scope of this rally, which affected dozens of raw materials from vegetable oil to coal, prompted many to talk about a new commodity supercycle, similar to the one that began almost two decades ago, when China's rapid industrialization changed the structure of the world economy. economy.Economists usually define a supercycle as a period of abnormally high demand that oil companies, mining companies and farmers are struggling to meet, causing a rally that lasts longer than the usual business cycle. Before China, the century of modern history witnessed three different commodity supercycles, each of which was caused by a transformational socio-economic event. The industrialization of the United States gave rise to the first in the early 1900s, global rearmament gave rise to the second in the 1930s, and the recovery of Europe and Japan after World War II gave rise to the third in the 1950s and 1960s.The appearance of the fifth supercycle would be a big event. The price rally confirms the talk of a new boom: the Bloomberg Commodity Spot Index, consisting of 23 commodities, is almost 500 points, which corresponds to the peaks of 2007-08 and 2010-11. And yet, what is more likely is that the world is still experiencing the impact of a China-led supercycle, which is now loaded with contradictory economic shifts caused by the coronavirus pandemic.Change in the value of commodities in one year The speed and scope of this rally, which affected dozens of raw materials, from vegetable oil to coal, prompted many to talk about a new commodity supercycle, similar to the one that began almost two decades ago, when China's rapid industrialization changed the structure of the world economy.Economists usually define a supercycle as a period of abnormally high demand that oil companies, mining companies and farmers are struggling to meet, causing a rally that lasts longer than the usual business cycle. Before China, the century of modern history witnessed three different commodity supercycles, each of which was caused by a transformational socio-economic event.The industrialization of the United States gave rise to the first supercycle in the early 1900s, global rearmament gave rise to another in the 1930s, and the recovery of Europe and Japan after World War II gave rise to a third in the 1950s and 1960s.The appearance of the fifth supercycle would be a big event. The price rally confirms the talk of a new boom: the Bloomberg Commodity Spot Index, consisting of 23 commodities, is almost 500 points, which corresponds to the peaks of 2007-08 and 2010-11. But it is more likely that the world is still under the influence of a super cycle led by China, which is now being spurred by the contradictory economic changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic.Initially, Covid was bad news for commodity demand. The world was locked up, travel was reduced, factories were closed. The price of everything from oil to copper followed consumption, falling sharply between March and May last year. But after the first few months, the world began to get back on its feet, and consumption patterns changed towards commodities.To understand what happened, it is necessary to understand the typical relationship between the demand for goods and well-being. As a rule, poor countries consume little raw materials, because most of the costs go to meet basic needs, such as food and housing.The optimal place for commodities is countries with a per capita income of $4,000 to $18,000 – the average income range that China entered in the early 2000s. This disproportionately affects the demand for commodities, since it depends on the level of urbanization and industrialization of countries. With this range of per capita income, families have the money to buy cars, household appliances and other goods that require a lot of raw materials.Industrially developing countries are also building railways, highways, hospitals and other public infrastructure.The demand for goods above $20,000 per capita begins to decline as the wealthier segments of the population spend the increase in wealth on services such as better education, health care and recreation.The coronavirus pandemic has changed this dynamic. Since many families are isolated, spending is shifting from services to goods, even in the wealthiest countries, such as the United States. In many ways, American and European consumers have been behaving in the same way as the population of developing countries for several months, spending money on buying various goods, from new bicycles to televisions.The US economy is the best example of this trend. Overall consumer spending remains below the trends of 2018-19, but this hides a huge discrepancy between spending on goods and services. According to the Peterson Institute for International Economics, household spending on goods is currently 11% higher than the level observed before the pandemic.  At the same time, spending on services such as recreation, restaurants or entertainment remains 7% lower than before the appearance of the coronavirus."Ultra-accommodative monetary policy, unprecedented fiscal stimulus, pent-up demand, strong household balance sheets and record savings all together paint a picture of a steady and confident growth trajectory," said Saad Rahim, chief economist at Trafigura. Fiscal stimulus has other parallels with emerging markets, as Western governments target infrastructure spending by promising to rebuild highways, railways and bridges.Governments are also striving to build a greener future in order to abandon fossil fuels. Although this is bad news for the coal and oil markets, it means an increase in demand for raw materials such as copper, aluminum and battery metals such as cobalt and lithium, which are key to the transition to green energy."Commodity prices will remain high for a long time to come," said Ivan Glasenberg, the outgoing CEO of commodities giant Glencore Plc. According to him, for the first time, two superpowers of the world, the United States and China, simultaneously promoted major infrastructure projects to save their economies from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.The offer is trying to catch up. Some of the bottlenecks are caused by deliberate actions by producing countries, such as the OPEC+ alliance, which cut oil production last year. And another shortage is due to the complexity of the work of mines, smelters and farms at the height of the pandemic.The decisive factor for the duration of growth is the structural restriction of supply, which means that high prices may not work as a signal to increase production and, ultimately, return the market to equilibrium.The forces that slow down the reaction of the proposal are twofold. First, there are more and more demands from the fighters against climate change that the same production of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and gas, be reduced. Secondly, the shareholders of the companies demand that the management pays them higher dividends, which, in turn, leaves less money for expanding mines or drilling new wells.The impact of these forces is already evident in some areas of the commodity market, where companies stopped investing in new supplies several years ago. Take, for example, thermal coal. Mining companies have been cutting costs since at least 2015. As demand increased, coal prices jumped to a level not seen in the last 10 years. The same thing happened with iron ore, whose prices soared to a record high at the beginning of this year. The next one is likely to be oil, where companies are significantly cutting costs.For commodity bulls like Doug King, this is a sign of doubling. "This is the beginning of a proper boom cycle, and this is not a temporary surge," he ...
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